Category Archives: Events
Ongoing Anti- G20 protests

What the Raid Shows about the Police States to Come

The week of demonstrations against the G20 summit in Hamburg got off to a telling start on Sunday. A lengthy court battleculminated with the highest court in Germany upholding the right of the anticapitalist camp to set up in Hamburg. Yet when they attempted to do so, the police blocked access to the park, directly violating the court ruling, then carried out a brutal raid in which several hundred riot police surrounded and brutalized campers and confiscated their belongings. The following firsthand account illustrates the world that the G20 summit in Hamburg represents—a world in which “peaceful protest” and court proceedings exist only to distract the naïve, while the whims of security forces are the law of the land. No wonder people are preparing to resist the G20.

Video footage showing the tremendous numbers of police involved in the raid.

What Happened at Enterwerder Park

The passive demonstration that nonprofit groups organized for Sunday was explicitly not directed at the G20 rulers but only at their policies—as if mere sign-holding could possibly have any influence on state policy. The real demonstrations are scheduled to take place later this week during the summit itself.

The original group that had formed to organize a campsite for protesters during the G20 summit had split along similar lines, with the group that was afraid of anything that smacked of “violence” or opposition to capitalism accepting a purely symbolicsite far away from central Hamburg, while the other group continued to push for a place in Hamburg proper. The latter group had apparently won, with Germany’s highest court ruling in their favor.

We arrive at Enterwerder Park in late afternoon. Hundreds of hopeful campers are gathered at the gates of the park, kept out by lines of police in heavy riot gear.

The police have filled the area with armored vans, blocking the roads, stopping and immobilizing vehicles belonging to prospective campers and anyone else they consider suspicious. The campers have set up a temporary gathering at the gates, serving delicious goulash to whoever wants it and conferring about what to do. There is considerable outrage about the police defying the orders that the court gave to let us into the park, but no one has any particular idea what to do. Despite police rhetoric about “violence” and “rioters,” none of us came prepared for a confrontation.

There’s no point in trying to discuss it with the officers themselves. Their expressions are blank: their vacant eyes look through us as if we are not there at all. Recruiting advertisements on the armored vans depict hip young Germans with androgynous haircuts, their fresh faces strangely cruel and disinterested. I catch my comrades’ attention: “BEFORE,” I suggest, pointing to the fresh faces on the posters; “AFTER,” I conclude, pointing to a grizzled senior officer whose haunted visage illustrates the impact of a lifetime of obeying orders.

The police keep clamping down, establishing new control points along the road to the gate. They set up blockades multiple lines deep to prevent anyone from carrying more food to the aspiring campers at the gate—apparently someone was throwing apples over their heads so the campers wouldn’t go hungry. Fucking terrorists!

One local confides to me that although police will be present this week from all over Germany, these are the local Hamburg police. She knows them personally from attending demonstrations here—one of them broke her jaw, then made a point of beating her again at a subsequent demonstration.

We fan out into the area to look for other delivery routes to the assembly around the gate. In fact, there are several ways the police haven’t noticed. Rather than concentrating on the places they are blocking or sitting around apathetically, we should be looking for the margins, the edges beyond their awareness. They can never control everything completely.

However, when we finally return to the front of the park, the police have stood down. The officers who are standing to the side of the gates in small groups look somewhat sheepish as campers walk joyously past them. Has the chief of police relented, agreeing to abide by the court decision after all? We applaud as one of the trucks loaded with supplies passes through the gate. The drivers had been waiting for several hours, surrounded by lines of riot police.

Cheerful campers who have already set up large tents pick them up together, a person at each pole, so the tents themselves stroll across the threshold of the gate and into the park. This is the genial, animated world we hope to build.

Campers begin to set up in the park.

Walking into the park, we pass dozens more armored vans and several more full squadrons of riot police in formation. It is beginning to dawn on us just how many of them are concentrated here. Groups of them surround the field in the park that will serve as our campsite. Nonetheless, the mood is festive as people set up the area. The practical-minded German protesters have prepared quite a bit of construction material. We eat and talk and compare notes together, speculating about what the week will bring.

As night begins to fall, groups of police withdraw from the field to the single road leading to the gate through which we entered. Are they leaving, finally? Will the campers finally be able to relax and get a little rest?

No—they’re not leaving. They’re massing at the end of the field, on the path leading to the gate.

Some of us go over to take a look. There are hundreds of them now, identical in their armor, line after line after line. Guns and batons and pepper spray hang at their sides. Each is dressed head to toe in thousands of euros worth of state-of-the-art protective gear, paid for by dutiful taxpayers who are not particularly curious about what Deutschland is doing with all their hard-earned income. The officers in the back have already put on their helmets.

They pull an armored van with a public address system on it to the front of their lines. People with medical conditions or histories of personal trauma are panicking as they try to figure out how to leave the park. The rest of us move towards the front. No one is eager to get arrested so early in the week, but we know that if we show any fear now, the police will be emboldened to bully and attack demonstrators all week long. We are not choosing whether to defend a campsite—we’re choosing whether to defend our capacity to demonstrate at all. If we don’t accept the gauntlet they’re throwing down, we will give away our freedom.

An announcement comes screeching through the speakers atop the police van: a man with a high-pitched, nasal voice is threatening us. People whistle and shout back at him. A camper makes a counter-announcement from the truck with the sound system in it and people cheer.

The police make a second announcement. The tension is thick in the darkening gloom: are we all going to jail? To the hospital? Then they make a third announcement, and the stormtroopers come marching in. We hear the sickening thud of their boots treading the ground in unison.

We mass around the sound truck and the tents, forming lines of our own. The police march around us, encircling us, and then they close in. They reach the sound truck, physically attacking the people around it. The chaos is disorienting—the shouting, the sound of people being beaten and pepper sprayed around us.

There is a person in the back of the sound truck where the sound system is. One officer sprays him full in the face with pepper spray, then the police grab him, pull him out of the truck, and throw him to the ground. Several officers crowd around him, kicking him over and over with their heavy boots. They kick him in the ribs, in the knees, in the neck, in the head. They do this calmly, robotically, and then they leave him on the ground, blinded, gasping, and contorted in pain.

They do not make any move to arrest him. Like the rest of the campers, he has not committed any crime.

Medics rush those of the injured who have managed to escape out of the police cordon. Ambulances pull up, anticipating serious or permanent injuries. Police wave around cameras on poles equipped with blinding searchlights. “Why are you filming?” shouts one camper.

“We’re not filming,” answers the officer flourishing the camera.

An eternity and a half hour later, the police march back in formation, half a dozen tents in their possession. All this to terrorize demonstrators, to show that brute force alone is all that counts in Hamburg.

Video footage showing the tremendous numbers of police involved in the raid.

Welcome to Hell, Indeed

“There will be no curiosity, no enjoyment of the process of life. All competing pleasures will be destroyed. But always there will be the intoxication of power, constantly increasing and constantly growing subtler. Always, at every moment, there will be the thrill of victory, the sensation of trampling on an enemy who is helpless. If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face—forever.” – George Orwell, 1984

The police seek to realize a vision of hell on earth. In the cosmology they represent, all humanity is suspect, guilty of potential insubordination, and only the constant threat of violence can keep us in line. Free will is a liability in a world in which the only conceivable purpose is to follow orders in return for a paycheck, so that everyone can be controlled and punished. Police are the murderers of freedom.

The worst thing about police is that they seek to strip us of the ability to imagine anything other than the reality they represent and impose. That is why it is worth it to them to spend millions of euros on an operation to seize a handful of tents. When they attack us—when they beat us with fists or batons, when they pepper-spray us, tear-gas us, or Taser us, when they shoot at us with concussion grenades, rubber bullets, marker rounds, or live ammunition—the real target of their assault is not our bodies, but our faith in humanity.eilnehmer eines „Autonomen Staffellaufs“ sind am 06.09.2015 beim Schanzenfest in Hamburg am Neuen Pferdemarkt unterwegs.

They seek to bludgeon out of us any hope that human beings could relate on equal terms, leaving only the ugly equation of authority, obedience, and violence. They represent the very worst our species is capable of—pure mercenary indifference—and they hope to make this exception into the norm.

This is not surprising. Their lies about “human nature” offer the only narrative that could possibly excuse their conduct. For our part, we know that human nature, if there is such a thing, is broad enough to include many possibilities, many different ways of being and relating.

The masters of these police—the leaders of the G20, who will be meeting in Hamburg this week—represent a political class that no longer has any idea how to respond to the problems of our time except with greater and greater exertions of coercive force. There is no longer any pretense that we are moving towards a free and beautiful future, but rather a climate-change catastrophe torn by civil wars, divided between dictatorships and increasingly flimsy pretenses of democracy. This is why the G20 leaders are increasingly reliant on the police forces, to the extent of letting them dictate state policy in defiance of court orders. Without the representatives of brute force on their side, the ruling class is sunk, and they know it.

In this sense, the police state has already arrived.

When Donald Trump explicitly endorses violence against journalists and other Republican politicians carry it out, it is clear enough that the gloves have come off. In nations that still pride themselves on being democratic, such politicians—and their apologists, some of whom pose as their adversaries—will attempt to convince protesters that the only way to be “democratic” themselves is to obey the laws and passively accept whatever impositions the police make, while the authorities themselves hasten towards the rule of pure force. If they succeed in convincing us to be passive, the future will assuredly be unmitigated tyranny.

Make no mistake: if there are clashes in Hamburg this week, if anyone sees fit to defend herself or himself from the tens of thousands of police officers that have assembled here to brutalize all who will not slavishly consent to their rule, the fault lies with the so-called forces of order. They started it with their unprovoked attack on the camp at Enterwerder Park, they started it by treating Hamburg as a training ground to practice mass police brutality, they started it by training and assembling all these thugs in the first place.

The demonstrators against the G20 are fighting for their lives. They are fighting for all of our lives, for the world that we all share together—and they are fighting out of the kindness of their hearts. On the other side of the lines, we see the police abdicating responsibility for their actions in return for thirty pieces of silver. Anything anyone can do to resist them, to disrupt their strategies for world domination and carve out spaces of freedom, is loyalty to what is best in humanity.

90232910

Yet the transformations we seek will not be won simply in symmetrical clashes with police and fascists. Above all, we have to make it possible to believe in what is freest and most beautiful in our species, even as the authorities strive to conceal it. We have to make our dreams contagious, so that one day the police will find themselves surrounded and isolated, the last ones who still subscribe to their hideous program. We have to make spaces of joy and healing in which they, too, might one day shed their shameful skins and become something beautiful and free.

Campers wait outside the police blockade; the raid involving nearly a thousand riot police.

Postscript: A Note on Strategy

The park was a trap. The police did not let us in because the court had ruled that we had a right to be there, but only so that they could surround, contain, and brutalize us.

Perhaps we should have stayed outside the police lines. When a huge number of police are available to the state, as during this G20 summit, it doesn’t pay to let them surround us. It’s better to remain at the margins of their zones of control, always forcing them to expand further, spreading their resources thinner and creating situations in which they can’t help but antagonize the general population.entenwerder_abend

At the edge of their range of control, our smaller numbers are not a problem—on the contrary, they can make it harder to track us, harder to predict what we will do next. When the authorities have to keep controlling ever wider areas, their bulk and force become liabilities, burdening them and provoking the public, drawing additional demographics and variables into the conflict.

This strategy of spreading out their area of concentration worked during the 2009 G20 summit in Pittsburgh, when protesters set out to cross the city in the opposite direction from the walls of riot police surrounding the meetings.

When the police realized what was going on and mobilized, attempting to establish control throughout large swathes of the city, they ended up turning the people of Pittsburgh against them, precipitating a series of new clashes in which business districts were demolished, the police lost legitimacy in the public eye, and many who had previously been outside the clashes were politicized.

If, rather than filing into the camp, we had remained at the edges, we might have accomplished some of the same things. At the least, we might have been able to draw the focus of the police away from assaulting the hapless campers. There was only a single entry point into the park for all those riot vans—had we blocked it, they surely would have been forced to shift their attention from the camp to the city around them, a hostile territory that wants no part of their summit and experiences them as an occupying force.

Perhaps these reflections can be of use over the coming days.

More footage from the raid.

Read coverage of the raid here, here, and here.

source:thefreeonline.wordpress.com

June 11th International Day of Solidarity with Long-Term Anarchist Prisoners

View Fullscreen

2017. Call

Solidarity Video for the June 11th

 

[Greece] January 21st 2017: Action Day in solidarity with Revolutionary Struggle

The poster reads:

“I am a revolutionary, and I have nothing to apologize for.

Terrorists, criminals, robbers are those who compose the economic and political life; the institutions and governments that, through the memoranda, are waging the most violent, the most heinous attack on the social base in the name of a “way out of the crisis.” Terrorist, criminal, robber is the State and Capital; those whom I fight committed with all my soul to armed struggle, to Revolutionary Struggle; those whom my organization has targeted all these years of our activity.

(…) when the economic and political establishment attacks the social majority in the most merciless way, armed struggle for social revolution is a duty and obligation; because that’s where hope lies and nowhere else. The only hope for a definitive way out of the systemic crisis we are living in this historical period, for a definitive way out of every crisis. It is the only hope towards overturning capitalism, the system that gives birth to crises; the only hope towards overturning the State and Capital.

It is the only hope for an armed counterattack of the social base against a system that crushes them.

It is the only hope towards overthrowing the State and Capital; for Social Revolution.

For a society of economic equality and political freedom for all.”

Pola Roupa

“I am an anarchist, member of the armed revolutionary organization Revolutionary Struggle. The only terrorists are the State and the Capital.”

Konstantina Athanasopoulou

Demonstration in solidarity with Revolutionary Struggle members

Saturday January 21st 2017 at 12:00 in Monastiraki (downtown Athens)

SOLIDARITY WITH THE REVOLUTIONARY STRUGGLE MEMBERS

NO EXEMPTION STATUS OF POLITICAL PRISONERS

STRUGGLE AGAINST THE STATE AND CAPITAL BY ANY MEANS

Solidarity Assembly (Athens)

Full text of callout in Greek.

source: contrainfo

Greece: Lambros-Viktoras Maziotis Roupas released from custody – Revolutionary Struggle comrades end hunger & thirst strike

After  4 days of hunger and thirst strike of 3 members of R.O. Revolutionary Struggle( Pola Roupa, Nikos Maziotis and Konstantina Athanasopoulou)we finally see an epilogue:

From InsurectionNews

According to Athens Indymedia a new order was issued by the prosecutor on 08.01.16 terminating the detention of Lambros-Viktoras Maziotis Roupas, the 6 year old son of Revolutionary Struggle members Pola Roupa and Nikos Maziotis, and awarding temporary custody of the child to his grandmother. The child has already left the hospital with his relatives. Comrades Pola Roupa, Nikos Maziotis and Konstantina Athanasopoulou have ended their hunger and thirst strike. A decision on final custody of the child will take place in six months time.

SOLIDARITY WITH REVOLUTIONARY STRUGGLE!

Pola Roupa and Konstantina Athanasopoulou were earlier this day 08.01.2017. transferred to the hospital, because of their health condition during this exhausting battle.

Solidarity actions took place all over Greece during this 4 days – people showing their support and solidarity with various gatherings, protests, letters, banners, graffiti. Also prisoners refuse to go in their cells and some of them wrote solidarity letters to the strikers, as well as other individuals  and organizations that condemned the Government, Minister of Justice, Health, and other responsible persons for holding and kidnapping a child and holding it non-legal in custody institutions isolated.

This precedent in treatment of the 6 year old child has seen as an act of class revenge and hatred to his parents because of their political choices of revolutionary armed struggle, and compares with dictatorship in Latin America as Dimitris Koufodinas, the member of 17N stated.

Solidarity Actions (via InsurectionNews):

07.01.17: Two OPKE (Group of Crime Prevention and Suppression) police vehicles ambushed in Exarcheia, Athens with Molotov cocktails, one OPKE vehicle completely destroyed.

07.01.17: 3 ATMs torched in Thessaloniki

06.01.17: Car torched outside the home of Tassos Tsakiridi, Deputy Mayor for Social Policy in the Neapoli-Sykies Municipality in Thessaloniki

Also on 06.01.17: NEA TV (TV News) station was occupied in Chania, Crete and 8 minute message was transmitted live in solidarity with the 3 imprisoned Revolutionary Struggle members on hunger & thirst strike:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

SOLIDARITY WITH REVOLUTIONARY STRUGGLE!

Greece: 20k Students Protest on Polytechnic Uprising Anniversary

B2qCACgIQAEQPri

 

ATHENS, Greece — More than 20,000 demonstrators have joined a rally in Athens marking the 41st anniversary of a deadly student uprising against the country’s former dictatorship. More than 7000 riot police have been deployed and several confrontations have already taken place today.

In Greece schools have been occupied for a week,  on the 13th the rector of Athens University was locked and guarded with the same riot police standing guard that attacked the demonstration on Wednesday bloodying the heads of two students.

After an entire day of protests and events attended by 10’s of thousands who demonstrated without any major incident, Greek police began a brutal crackdown.  Police attacked with teargas, sound grenades and batons injuring at least 7 protesters and two Vice-Gr journalists who were both sent to the hospital for care. 73 people were detained and 10 arrested. The videos below document the police violence. Many protesters did try and remain calm and continue with marches despite violent police while others retaliated and resisted the police assault by throwing stones and even molotovs.

In Athens Greek motorbike cops beat man unconscious, then leave him helpless in the street.

source

Student protests and clashes in Greece

In Greece schools are occupied since one week, and today the rector of Athens University locked the university with riot police that attacked the students demostration.
It’s been sometime since we last heard from the Greek movement. But, thanks to the Greek government and its riot police, today became a day of large student demonstrations, clashes with the cops, injuries and rising tension. First, let’s see what happened. Early in the morning, the Athens Law School students arrived at their University in order to apply their Assembly decision, which included a symbolic occupation of their University until the 17th of November, commemoration day of the 1973 student revolt against the military dictatorship.

The problem was that the school was already occupied by the riot police. The Athenian Universities’ rectors had decided to apply a peculiar “lock out” of the students and employees, supposedly for “security reasons”. The government gave a helping hand by sending hundreds of cops, in riot gear, to apply the decision. The cops assaulted the students, seriously injuring a couple of them and dispersing the rest. The news circulated, public outrage was expressed for the police blockades and violence, hundreds of students demonstrated in the center of Athens during lunchtime, and another protest, involving thousands, is now going around the Universities, confronting a total police blockade of the city center.

A question I guess the Italian reader would put is why this mess, and why now? November is the traditional month of student mobilization in Greece. Yet, in the last years, seldom –if ever- did the protests go beyond the symbolic level, as the movement was too preoccupied with the country’s current problems to seriously devote itself in commemorations.This school year (anno scolastico) though, started with incredible problems for both schools and universities, due to underfunding and lack of teaching and administrative personnel. Hundreds of schools were occupied in the previous weeks and soon enough the universities joined the struggle.

The mobilization, if we want to be sincere, seemed quite weak until now. In a collapsed country, where everyone is waiting for the government to collapse as well and for the elections that will bring the left-wing SYRIZA to power, some hundreds of occupied schools do not make a real difference. It is also noteworthy that the student population of Greece, which was traditionally at the avant-garde of the movements and had led all major mobilizations since the 1990s and up to 2008, was largely absent from the large anti-austerity protests of 2010-2012.
But, as it seems, our surrealist government is doing its best to reverse the situation. As I am concluding these lines, the student protest arrived at the Polytechnic University of Athens in Exarchia (where it all started back in 1973), the students forced open the doors and entered with the purpose of making yet another Assembly. The police immediately attacked. Eye-witnesses report several injuries among protesters; hundreds are barricaded inside the Polytechnic. The burning smell of tear gas is spreading, once again, in Athens.

By Markos Vogiatzoglou, http://eagainst.com/articles/student-protests-and-clashes-in-greece/

November 17 or why this day is so important for Greeks

A date haunts Greece, the date of November 17.
It’s the date when the uprising of several hundred of students, who stood up against the military dictatorship by occupying the Athens Polytechnic, was brutally crushed.

17Ν-tank
The iconic photo of a tank driving through the Polytechnic’s gate is a symbol of freedom for (probably) all Greeks…
It was back in 1973. The student uprising was crushed but the beggining of the end for the military junta begun that day. The colonels fell from power a year later, in the summer of 1974.
Aristotle Sarrikostas: The photo reporter of the invasion of tank in Polytechnic University of Athens

sarikostas-400x230

The historic photograph of Aristotle Sarrikostas, the only photo reporter who has managed to capture the moment of entering the tank in Polytechnic along with footage of just 35 seconds of the Dutch cameraman Albert Kurad, were the compelling documents to refute the initial police statements that “in the University of Athens did not happen anything”

 

If the state does not burn, who will illuminate the dark?

The violence is also a self-defense.

Given the crimes committed by the state the most consistent thing is to response.

In the war of simbolical things, to burn objects is scarcely a minimal sign of fill.

Some people say that these actions will increase repression. Aren’t they aware that
the state eliminated 40 students?

The case of Iguala was the trigger, but for a long time the state has committed a series
of injustices and atrocities against Mexican society. Just to mention few: Acteal, WHITE WATER,
Chiapas, Atenco, ABC, SAN FERNANDO, TLATALAYA.

So will the State punish the same State? You can not change things insade the same law. The laws
are chains, and if you want to liberate yourself you must break them. They use laws to stay free and
exploiting. They use laws to subject and exploit us.

The town keeps putting the dead, missing persons and detainees.

However, in the face of such facts, the liberals acts in defense of State violence, criminalising those who,
with their reasons and arguments, understand that pacifism is an alibi to submit the protest.

The pacifism appears to help the State in the task of preventing from overflowing with radicalism the popular movement.
The politics of the nonviolence is what allows the State and the capital to suppress and to exploit without any resistance.

 

Source: http://contrainfocruznegra.blogspot.com/2014/11/mexico-si-no-arde-el-estado-quien.html

France: Protester killed in clashes with police at the ZAD of Testet

Background info on the struggle against the dam in Testet: 1, 2

According to a statement from squatters in the ZAD of Notre-Dame-des-Landes, during the night between Saturday and Sunday the 26th of October 2014 a protester named Remi was killed in clashes that broke out after a rally against the construction of a dam along the Sivens forest in the wetland of Testet in the Tarn department (southern France).

Around 7000 people gathered in the ZAD (zone to be defended) of Testet, after months of police attacks and destruction of the wetland and habitations of those who defend the area. In the late evening and overnight, dozens of people attacked the forces of order that were protecting the dam construction site. Activists expressed their anger trying to delay the resumption of works, originally scheduled for Monday the 27th of October.

The cops fired rubber bullets (known as flash-balls), distraction devices such as stun hand grenades and fragmentation grenades, and tear gases. According to testimonies of protesters from the Testet wetland area, Remi must have collapsed after being hit with a grenade; then his body was reportedly taken by the repressive forces.

Prefectural authorities stated they did not want to comment on the matter before the official autopsy was made public on Monday. The government has already begun to stigmatize the protesters, in addition to trying to divide them in order to cover up what happened. But they know very well that, whatever they do, this death will have explosive consequences.

Footage from protest in the evening of October 26th in the town of Gaillac in the Tarn department:

 

 

 

Calls against state violence and updates on planned actions in Nantes and elsewhere at: zad.nadir.org & nantes.indymedia.org

source

Call for International Solidarity Actions, this weekend, October 11th-12th.

Smash ISIS, their ally the Turkish state, and the borders choking the Rojava Revolution!

Over 2 years ago, the Kurds of Northern Syria launched the Rojava revolution along autonomous, socialist, feminist and ecological principles. They have now been under constant attack from the Islamic State (ISIS) for more than a year. Thousands of volunteer fighters with Rojava’s Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) and its all-women counterpart the YPJ have been struggling to defend their cities and villages. Since July, the North Syrian city of Kobanê, in the central canton of Rojava, has been under siege by ISIS. ISIS fighters, armed with modern U.S. manufactured tanks, artillery, and small arms have been held at bay by the YPG and YPJ armed only with outdated small arms and improvised weapons. Actions by Kurdish and Turkish activists at the Turkish border with Kobanê have fought to remove the border since July in order to join the YPG and YPJ as well as to receive injured Kurds and the elderly and children who are fleeing the fighting.

The ruling party in Turkey, the AKP, has both implicitly and explicitly supported ISIS with armaments and logistical support. The vast majority of jihadists who have travelled to Syria and Iraq have used Turkey as a crossing point under the facilitation of the Turkish government who is using ISIS as a proxy to eliminate the revolution in Rojava.

The US-led coalition formed in September against ISIS is comprised of the same imperialist powers who have artificially designed the current map of the Middle East following WWI, facilitated coups in the region and more recently bombed and occupied Iraq. They have also supplied the weapons currently being used by ISIS. Their air strikes have done little to stop the spread of ISIS. The radical Kurdish movement in the region has repeatedly emphasized that what they need to defeat ISIS is the opening of corridors between Turkish Kurdistan and Syrian Kurdistan as well as armaments that will be effective against the heavy artillery of ISIS.

A vicious and intense fight for the streets of Kobanê is now in full swing as the fate of the Rojava Revolution hangs in the balance. Thus far, the YPG and YPJ have successfully held off the ISIS invasion but the situation is growing increasingly desperate. In the face of ISIS advances, the Kurdish movement in Turkey has launched their own insurrection recognizing that ISIS is fundamentally enabled by Erdogan and the AKP. The PYD of Rojava shares aspirations and affinity with the Kurdish Workers Party (PKK) in Turkey. Radical Islamist gangs, supported by the AKP, have been attacking the demonstrators in Turkey and at least 24 people have died since Tuesday.

Solidarity demonstrations with Kobanê have now taken place in Athens, Brussels, Amsterdam, Paris, Ireland, New York City and multiple cities in Germany. This upcoming weekend it is time to organize a solidarity demonstration where you live. Rojava is the only alternative for a different kind of Middle East, and it is crucial to demonstrate our solidarity with those fighting to defend it.

Anarchists in Turkey have taken up the fight to stand in solidarity with the autonomous area against ISIS and the Turkish State. Stand in solidarity with our comrades and the ongoing resistance.

For more information on the Rojava Revolution and the fight for Kobanê :

“Rojava: a struggle against borders and for autonomy”: http://roarmag.org/2014/07/kurdistan-rojova-syria-autonomy/
“Why is the world ignoring the revolutionary Kurds in Syria?”:http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/oct/08/why-world-ignoring-revolutionary-kurds-syria-isis

“Turkish-Kurdish relations threatened by ISIL”:http://www.aljazeera.com/news/middleeast/2014/10/turkish-kurdish-relations-threatened-isil-201410892311126563.html

“Anarchists join fight against ISIS to defend Kurdish Autonomous Areas”:https://libcom.org/news/anarchists-join-fight-against-isis-defend-kurdish-autonomous-areas-03102014

Turkish anarchist group, DAF: http://www.facebook.com/anarsistfaaliyetorg

Call for support of DAF by Denver Anarchist Black Cross:http://denverabc.wordpress.com/2014/10/07/call-for-support-for-devrimci-anarsist-faaliyet-daf-and-the-people-of-kobane/

Anti-nuclear demo of 16,000 people in Tokyo against plan to restart reactors at Sendai (Japan)

Some 16,000 people rallied Tuesday 23/09 in Tokyo against the government’s plan to restart nuclear reactors, more than three years after the Fukushima disaster. It was one of the largest anti-nuclear demonstrations since the state nuclear watchdog on September 10 approved plans to restart two reactors at the Sendai plant in southern Japan.

“Three and a half years has passed since the nuclear accident, but self-examination has yet to be made,” Nobel literature laureate Kenzaburo Oe told the Tokyo rally, according to public broadcaster NHK. “The government is going ahead with the plan to resume operation at the Sendai plant without compiling sufficient anti-disaster plans,” Oe said.

After the rally demonstrators marched through the capital, carrying banners like: “We don’t need nuclear plants”.

As the government tries to convince a skeptical public about the necessity of nuclear power, on Sunday 21/9, new industry minister Yuko Obuchi said the resource-poor nation should be “realistic about its energy needs”. In pre-Fukushima Japan, nuclear power accounted for nearly one-third of the country’s energy needs.

The Nuclear Regulatory Authority has said the two reactors were satisfactory but hurdles still remain, including getting the consent of local communities in a country still scarred by the catastrophe where all 48 viable reactors are offline. Widespread angry anti-government and anti-nuclear sentiment has simmered ever since the earthquake and tsunami in March 2011 caused meltdowns at Fukushima, sparking the worst atomic disaster since Chernobyl.

Tens of thousands of people were evacuated from their homes, many of whom have not been allowed to return. Scientists say some areas might have to be abandoned forever. There have been anti-fascist and anti-government demonstrations taking place, and angry protestors accuse the media and state of hiding the news of them occurring and so trying to stop the people’s rage from being known.

Next Page